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379 New local job ALERTs in the last 30 Days
Total Number of Companies Covered 4012
10 New local job ALERTs in the past day

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2010 – a good year but sad too

In 2010 we were busy…

… with training new marketing and search associates, working on some great new job opportunities, working on the oppcourse to Get Working NOW!, planning the new “Marketing Services by zenPeak Recruiters”, plus plus plus!

Personally its been a very good year. The business is growing the way I want it to. I faced up to some challenges and made decisions that I am comfortable with.  I have added more staff and am still looking for a Search Associate, a Marketing Associate both well-paid part-time, work from home positions.

I’ve been learning like crazy this year both personally & professionally – and when you are well into your 50s I think this is a good thing. Finally I know this isn’t a good thing to share to job seekers, but I made a personal decision to never work for anyone else again in my life, and to turn down all offers outside my own business interests. I have a lot to accomplish and its all about the journey!

Sadly, one of my oldest friends, Jack Goldhar passed away suddenly at the end of October. He was single and had devoted 30 years of his life to caring for his severely ill Mom Helen (died 2 years ago), and in the past 2 years his Dad Sam (died in 2010) . Within 6 months of his Dad’s passing, Jack dropped dead. I always say “We like people for their qualities, but we love them for their quirks”  We loved Jack and yes, he was plenty quirky. I still can’t believe he is gone.

I made some new friends at the dog park this year… Wayne, Linda, Charlie, MaryAnn. They often get some of my fresh homemade munchies; bagels, blueberry buns or muffins, and they are usually very happy. My trip to the dog park is my daily midday break for an hour. Many Clients and Candidates have gotten use to hearing a bark in the background if they call me. I do business 24/7 so I always take calls 🙂

and…I’m looking forward to 2011! How about you?

Staying Positive During a Long Job Search

helpguide.org

helpguide.org was setup by Robert & Jeanne Segal after their daughter Morgan committed suicide in 1999. The story is here.

It is an amazing resource for healthy living with a strong emphasis on mental health. They offer information and  links to help people cope.

For example,…

Staying positive during a long job search

A long job search can wear on your attitude and outlook, especially if you’re unemployed. If it’s taking you longer than anticipated to find work, the following tips can help you stay focused and upbeat.

  • Keep a regular daily routine. When you no longer have a job to report to every day, you can easily lose motivation. Treat your job search like a regular job, with a daily “start” and “end” time. Following a set schedule will help you be more efficient and productive while you’re unemployed.
  • Create a job search plan. Avoid getting overwhelmed by breaking big goals into small, manageable steps. Instead of trying to do everything at once, set priorities. If you’re not having luck in your job search, take some time to rethink your goals.
  • List your positives. Make a list of all the things you like about yourself, including skills, personality traits, accomplishments, and successes. Write down projects you’re proud of, situations where you excelled, and things you’re good at. Revisit this list often to remind yourself of your strengths.
  • Volunteer. Unemployment and job loss can wear on your self-esteem and make you feel useless. Volunteering helps you maintain a sense of value and purpose. And helping others is an instantaneous mood booster. Volunteering can also provide career experience, social support, and networking opportunities.
  • Focus on the things you can control. You can’t control how quickly a potential employer calls you back or whether or not they decide to hire you. Rather than wasting your precious energy on things that are out of your hands, turn your attention to things you can control during your unemployment,, such as writing a great cover letter and resume tailored to the company you want to work for and setting up meetings with your networking contacts.

Career & Life Choices: job vs. self-employed vs. business owner – 3 of 3

  1. Ever thought about going into business for yourself, and wondered if you are the right type?
  2. What are the differences between being self-employed and business ownership?
  3. How do you reduce the risks of being self-employed, on commission, or starting a business?

How do you reduce the risks of being self-employed, on commission, or starting a business?

In part 1 we linked to the XL Wealth approach to help identify your success profile.

In part 2, we touched on the difference between self-employment, running a business, and the relative security of being a successful salesperson (and being a revenue & profit generator) vs. having a job and being a cost center.

In this 3rd part we share zenPeak’s risk reduction for self-employment, running a business, and working in a commissioned job.

For self-employed persons needing peak performing assistants or staff, and for businesses needing peak performers in every role, our NO RISK recruitment process and pricing is guaranteed to deliver. We even have special pricing for recruiting commissioned salespersons that are NO RISK to you.

What if starting or owning a business is impractical, and/or your skills are not suited to being self-employed?

Consider the security, and high income enjoyed by successful commissioned salespeople. This week alone we have 3 sales roles, in our client companies, where the top performers (all women by the way) earned $175,000 – online ad listings, $ 160,000 – telecom sales, and $180,000 – mortgage sales, respectively;  each of them can walk into any competitor and get a sales position instantly. That’s security!

zenPeak  has a number of these sales position opportunities that we call “certified”. What does this mean? The bottom line is that we carefully select the positions and companies we recruit for to make sure they offer the potential for high income earnings.

  1. The Hiring Company is strong and has been in business for at least 10 years.
  2. The Hiring Company has marketing programs in place to support sales and the sales force to grow the business.
  3. The Hiring Company has training and support programs in place to assist new hires.
  4. The Hiring Company is local and operates out of permanent professional facilities


Career & Life Choices: job vs. self-employed vs. business owner – 2 of 3

  1. Ever thought about going into business for yourself, and wondered if you are the right type?
  2. What are the differences between being self-employed and business ownership?
  3. How do you reduce the risks of being self-employed, on commission, or starting a business?

What are the differences between being self-employed and business ownership?

According to Robert Kiyosaki, being self-employed and earning income based on an hourly rate or owning your job, is different from being a business owner. A business owner can earn income regardless of being at the office and/or working day to day. A doctor or dentist or real estate agent for example, are self-employed but still depend on their own day to day involvement and input to earn the bulk of their income. Being self-employed removes you from the insecurity of having a job and the possibility of being fired.

If you are a high-producing commissioned salesperson, you may not be technically self-employed, but the risks of being fired and not being able to replace your job, are low; since you clearly contribute to revenues and profits vs. being an expense or drain on a business.

If you are not comfortable having your own business, and are more inclined to being self-employed or secure in a commissioned sales role, then give some thought to how to increase your chance for success. It’s not just what you sell, but where and for whom that counts!

Career & Life Choices: job vs. self-employed vs. business owner – 1 of 3

  1. Ever thought about going into business for yourself, and wondered if you are the “right type”?
  2. What are the differences between being self-employed and business ownership?
  3. How do you reduce the risks of being self-employed, on commission, or starting a business?

1. Are you the right type to be in business for yourself?

Whether you are fresh out of high school with “fire in the belly”  to build an empire, or mid career, out of a job and looking for an alternative to a job search that isn’t going anywhere,  being in business for yourself will be easier with self-awareness of what you are “good” at, and best suited for.

One of the most interesting approaches to developing self awareness and understanding how you fit is offered by Roger Hamilton’s  XL Wealth Dynamics.

Each of us has a path of least resistance that is based on our natural habits and talents – the ones we were born with. If we are not on our path, life can be a struggle. When we follow our path – and begin to play the game that we most naturally play, we begin to excel. We also find we are doing what we love. These are the eight wealth profiles.

The message is not about whether you should be in business, but discovering what role, or wealth profile  you are best suited for in order to be successful.

  • Mechanic
  • Creator
  • Star
  • Supporter
  • Deal Maker
  • Trader
  • Accumulator
  • Lord